Studio Formafantasma's research process at Made Academy with terracotta.

Our weekly serving of off-the-menu items—a few popular favorites from the week, as well as a few morsels that may have slipped your notice.


You Are What You Eat?
Although fashion designers have taken inspiration from food before, artist Sung Yeon Ju is taking edible fashion to new heights with her project Wearable Foods, an image series depicting dresses made entirely from different fruits, vegetables and fungi. The photos play with an imagined reality, displaying a real and accessible material in an unfamiliar form.


Algae, algae everywhere
As we’ve been reporting since 2015, designers are increasingly turning to algae for material explorations. Core77 surveys some interesting algae-based projects and includes some basic principals of cultivating and working with the, “30,000 and 1 million different species of algae.”


Notes from the Regenerative Food System Forum
Missed the first Regenerative Food System Investment Forum? AgFunder reporter Lauren Stine attended and shared her notes from the Oakland gathering.


Beer Waste Lamps for Social Impact
Italian design firm High Society is repurposing food waste from coffee and beer by crafting recycled light structures. Constructed from discarded coffee bean peels, hops and barley, the tubular body of each lamp is compostable. In addition to the eco-friendly homewares, High Society is using profits from the venture to fund addiction prevention programs.


Tackling the Takeaway Container Conundrum
East Coast fast casual chain DIG, whose farming program we recently wrote about, is piloting a reusable takeaway container program today in New York City. Canteen by Dig is an app-based subscription service that allows users to take away a hard-shelled melamine bowl and return it to the same location for $3 a month.


Formafantasma Launches Geo-Design MA at DAE
Italian design duo Formafantasma is heading up the new Geo-Design program at Design Academy Eindhoven to develop research and communication tools by “assembl[ing] a framework of diverse knowledge—from material histories to cultural world-views, from humanism to ecology, from plant and animal rights to artificial intelligence, from the Earth’s core to outer space,” Disegno reports.