Audience members assemble to hear a guest lecture at EAT Stockholm.
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Contemporary food systems face a variety of important issues as our global population grows and the earth changes in response to human development. These challenges are complicated and nuanced, requiring multilateral solutions that engage leaders and policies from a variety of disciplines. EAT Stockholm aims to open up a discussion about how we can begin to address these issues, connecting leaders from across the world at a two-day long conference.

The EAT Stockholm Food Forum 2018, to be held on June 11-12, will host prominent speakers including Massimo Bottura, head chef of Osteria Francescana, and Dr. Kristalina Georgieva, CEO of the World Bank. In addition to its host of dynamic speakers and paneled discussions, EAT Stockholm provides audience members with the opportunity to network with and learn from one another through workshops and interactive plenaries. This year’s forum will focus on the intersection of sustainable food sourcing and healthy diets. This meeting point highlights two pressing challenges for global food systems; as populations grow exponentially it’s difficult for nutrient-exhausted lands to keep up with the number of crops that need to be produced. Furthermore, poor diets are increasing the prevalence of obesity, and the resulting heart disease among other complications presents a threat to public health. While facing such daunting societal problems may seem an insurmountable task, EAT Stockholm seeks to question how we can begin to deal with them on both an individual and larger, policy oriented level.

Although EAT Stockholm is an invitation-only event, you can request an invitation at their website if your professional career might play a role in the solutions that the forum searches for. Furthermore, the conference is livestreamed so that you can follow the speakers and their panels. This provides not only an opportunity for educating oneself about large scale issues with food systems, but also allows us to see what we can change in our day-to-day lives to help address these issues.